Articles

Topic: Eyetracking

Photos as Web Content

November 1, 2010

Users pay close attention to photos and other images that contain relevant information but ignore fluffy pictures used to 'jazz up' Web pages.

Corporate Blogs: Front Page Structure

August 9, 2010

Showing summaries of many articles is more likely to draw in users than providing full articles, which can quickly exhaust reader interest.

Website Response Times

June 21, 2010

Slow page rendering today is typically caused by server delays or overly fancy page widgets, not by big images. Users still hate slow sites and don't hesitate telling us.

Horizontal Attention Leans Left

April 6, 2010

Web users spend 69% of their time viewing the left half of the page and 30% viewing the right half. A conventional layout is thus more likely to make sites profitable.

Scrolling and Attention

March 22, 2010

Web users spend 80% of their time looking at information above the page fold. Although users do scroll, they allocate only 20% of their attention below the fold.

Investor Relations (IR) on Corporate Websites

May 25, 2009

Individual investors are intimidated by overly complex IR sites and need simple summaries of financial data. Both individual and professional investors want the company's own story and investment vision.

Press Area Usability

January 20, 2009

As 3 studies of journalists show, they use the Web as a major research tool, exhibit high search dominance, and are impatient with bloated sites that don't serve their needs or list a PR contact.

Banner Blindness: Old and New Findings

August 20, 2007

Users rarely look at display advertisements on websites. Of the 4 design elements that do attract a few ad fixations, one is unethical and reduces the value of advertising networks.

Talking-Head Video Is Boring Online

December 5, 2005

Eyetracking data show that users are easily distracted when watching video on websites, especially when the video shows a talking head and is optimized for broadcast rather than online viewing.

Eyetracking Study of Web Readers

May 14, 2000

Poynter study confirms older Web content studies: plain headlines work best; users hunt for info, often ignore graphics, and interlace sites.