Articles

Topic: Writing for the Web

  • How Chunking Helps Content Processing

    March 20, 2016

    Chunking is a concept that originates from the field of cognitive psychology. UX professionals can break their text and multimedia content into smaller chunks to help users process, understand, and remember it better.

    “Learn More” Links: You Can Do Better

    December 13, 2015

    The phrase ‘Learn More’ is increasingly used as a crutch for link labels. But the text has poor information scent and is bad for accessibility. With a little effort, transform this filler copy into descriptive labels that help users confidently predict what the next page will be.

    An FAQ’s User Experience Deconstructed

    January 25, 2015

    Good FAQ pages use legible typography, chunking, appropriate spacing, easy navigation to individual questions, and reflect the current questions of the site users.

    FAQs Still Deliver Great Value

    December 21, 2014

    A usable website FAQ can improve products, services, information, and user experience as part of your knowledge management process.

    A Link is a Promise

    December 14, 2014

    The words in a link label make a strong suggestion about the page that is being linked to. The destination page should fulfill what the anchor text promises.

    Satisficing: Quickly Meet Users’ Main Needs

    March 30, 2014

    Unless faced with life-changing information, most site visitors won't read all of the content provided but settle for a “good-enough” answer. Better sorting and clearer writing satisfy users without exhausting the limited time they’re willing to spend on a website.

    Avoid Category Names That Suck

    December 15, 2013

    Categories and hypertext act as signs and should give people a strong indication of what will happen even before they click on the link. People avoid clicking on unknown items or, even worse, ignore them all together.

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